Crypto Cockney, join in…

Please join me in the new campaign of Crypto Cockney, please add your suggestions in the comments…

“Shilling” will now be known as “Able” or “Able and Willing”

e.g. Stop willing that project in our group, it’s another shitcoin.

“Dip” will now be known as “Apple pip”

e.g. Buy the f*cking Apple pip… BTFAP!

Don’t forget to try out our amazing new mobile app Zooch! , plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, check out crypto and fintech news at Fresherblock, and even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc.

Building a startup is like: “Going around a corner that never ends”

The Fintech panel at the KinnerLat conference 2019 in Panama featured Carlos Vega from Tesorio, Felipe Echandi from Cuanto, Raymond Katz from Adelantos, Luis Ruben from Yotepresto and Raquel Garcia from Credicorp.

Roberto Saint-Malo, Carlos Vega, Felipe Echandi, Raymond Katz, Luis Ruben, Raquel Garcia and BIDLab

A few choice quotes from Tesorio CEO Carlos Vega: building a startup early on and trying to find product-market fit is like “going around a corner that never ends”… It’s all about “speed of iterations and experiments”… After you hit product-market fit, “scaling outside of Silicon Valley is so much more cost-effective.”

Don’t forget to try out our amazing new mobile app Zooch! , plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, check out crypto and fintech news at Fresherblock, and even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc.

How to moderate the Best Crypto Panel ever; Tips for a highly engaging panel that your audience will love

by Adrian Scott, Ph.D., Founder/CEO of Freedom Stack

Originally posted in Crypto Daily at https://cryptodaily.co.uk/2019/11/moderates-crypto-paneltips-engaging

Hi folks, I am Adrian Scott, founder of Freedom Stack. If you want to become a profitable investor or already are one and want to have a handy mobile app to make trades while managing risk, please take a moment and check out our new app, Zooch, at www.zooch.com.

On Friday at the America’s Blockchain Summit, we had a really great panel on the Future of Blockchain and got a lot of feedback from the audience about how they particularly appreciated the dynamics and liveliness of our panel.

I thought I’d share a few details on things that went well, plus some additional ideas I had afterwards, and I hope that this may help other panel moderators and conference organizers.

When a panel goes well, the audience really benefits from the expertise and contrasting perspectives of the different panelists. They also appreciate the energy of the interplay between the panelists, the moderator and the audience, which can make the sessions a lot more interesting than regular conference talks by just one person.

Here are a few tips that worked for us:

– Tip 1: Let the panelists do most of their personal intro’s rather than the moderator and start with that. Have them keep the intro’s brief but with enough content so that the audience understands why the panelists might have great advice and perspective to share.

Photo: Rowan Stone, Horizen, courtesy of America’s Blockchain Summit

– Tip 2: Here’s an idea: for each panel you moderate, try out 2 ways to engage the audience… One thing I did was ask for a show of hands of which people are entrepreneurs or helping build a business or hope to create a business in the future… Hint: that’s almost everybody in many countries… and then I also asked for a show of hands for which people were thinking about or trying to figure out how they might use blockchain in their current or future business… again, that’s going to be a high percentage at a blockchain conference… The neat thing there is not just that people get to do a little physical exercise by raising their hands — they also get to see that they have something in common with the people around them. Now, a question to avoid: “How many people own bitcoin?”, because that’s like asking who’s carrying around $500 today?… A better option could be asking how many people have created a bitcoin wallet or crypto exchange account.

– Tip 3: If you think the audience might not understand what your panelist is talking about, don’t hesitate, jump in, interrupt your panelist and explain what’s going on. For example I jumped in a couple of times during the panel. One time it was to mention what a particular blockchain project was that a panelist was talking about, because I knew that many folks in the audience did not know it. Your panelists are experts and they may forget that not all of the audience will understand the references that they make.

– Tip 4: In preparing the panel, I came up with 4 main topics and shared those with the panelists beforehand, and I think that worked out well.

Photo: Mark Jeffrey, Guardian Circle, courtesy of America’s Blockchain Summit

– Tip 5: Preserve time for audience questions, and also try to set the audience up to actually have some questions — it’s an important metric on the success of the panel, and it’s also a sign that they have been engaged in the experience. The conference organization may have a monitor screen to show you how much time is left in the session. You could clarify with them whether that number includes the time left for audience questions or not.

– Tip 6: During the panel, you can call on particular panelists to answer a question or address a particular topic first, to make sure there is a good balance between time and content amongst the different panelists. Some may speak longer to explain a concept, and different panelists can have different levels of expertise in the points you’re addressing.

Adrian Scott, Freedom Stack / Zooch!, courtesy of America’s Blockchain Summit

– Tip 7: A couple of extra bonus points: How about having a slide that’s on during the panel that includes the social media handles and/or web sites for your panelists and moderator. That gives the audience a way to continue the experience beyond the conference, and also gives the panelists some marketing value. And here’s another thought: You could also prepare an extra slide or two mentioning a chart or trend that could be displayed during the panel for your panelists to address. That will provide some extra visual variety for the audience, adding another dimension to the experience.

I’d like to thank the panelists who joined me on Friday in making the panel a success, Rowan Stone from Horizen, Mark Jeffrey from Guardian Circle and Randy Hilarski from Aesop Social, and thank you to the organizer, David Proenza, his team and the audience at the Americas Blockchain Summit in Panama.

Don’t forget to try out our amazing new mobile app Zooch! , plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, or even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc.

NN Taleb is talking about Bitcoin for Lebanon as Central Bank replacement

The Bitcoin force is strong in Nassim Nicholas Taleb. He calls Bitcoin the only solution for freedom from rule by central bankers, and said it on national TV in Lebanon.

Don’t forget to try out our amazing new mobile app Zooch! , plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, or even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc.

Want to poop in China? Facial recognition if you want toilet paper – I sh*t you not

You may have heard that China has gone gaga over facial recognition technology. It appears in government areas — China now fingerprints and photographs all foreigners entering the country. And it appears in private locations — such as entering business buildings (hello, Alibaba).

But this latest one may take the cake.

In the Hangzhou train station bathroom, visitors need to stand in front of the camera for 3 seconds to get their face scanned in order to receive toilet paper.

I shit you not.

Cameras in bathrooms, not creepy a.f. Visit China, they said…

Glad I spent a lot of time in China in the ’90s…

Don’t forget to try out our amazing new mobile app Zooch! , plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, or even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc.

Improv for Business People… Why? The Hat Game

I regularly do “improv” — improvisation. Sometimes we rehearse and practice in a small group, sometimes I perform in public.

What is improv? Well, first of all, it’s not stand-up comedy. In fact, improv doesn’t even need to be comedy or make you laugh, even though a lot of improv scenes are quite funny. You can create an improvised work in any genre, including drama, musical, film noir, opera, etc.

Improv is a group of people creating and simultaneously acting out a story together without a script or plan. That group could just have one person in it also.

There are many great business benefits to it. It’s even said that unicorn Palantir gives out copies of Keith Johnstone’s book Impro to all new employees.

Here are key benefits for business people:

  • Improve your listening skills, something key to sales and teamwork. You need to keep track of the name of the other characters in the scene, references to other characters, what is going on and what is being said. It really helps you up your listening skills.
  • Improve your creativity and ability to shift course quickly — As you improvise a scene you may think it’s going in one direction, and then a teammate adds something new to the story that takes it in a whole new direction, and you have to be able discard your preconceived notions.
  • Improve ability to jump into any situation without fear — you quickly learn that it’s ok to fail or be imperfect, but you also learn techniques on how to succeed and create something from nothing. This can eliminate your fears and embarassment when you have to do something in public, because you can always rely on patterns and learnings from improv.

Here’s a Hat Game sketch we recorded last night, in Spanish. Each player is trying to take the hat off of the other person while still improvising a real scene. The first one to remove the hat ‘wins’ and at that time the scene ends. But what is winning and who really wins… and what happens when you’re improvising a scene while you are scheming to achieve that goal?

Don’t forget to try out our new app Zooch! which will also help you feel flow, plus subscribe to this blog to get notifications of new posts, plus follow me on Twitter and Instagram, and get trading on BitMEX, or even schedule a call with me for some advice, etc. Oh, and where did I learn improv? I learned it from instructors at BATS Improv in San Francisco, California, including in courses they taught that I took at American Conservatory Theatre.

Hat Game Improv
Hat Game Improv

When your Angel anti-portfolio includes PayPal and Salesforce.com

While I’m focused on building my new startup and its app, Zooch, I wanted to join the great tradition of publishing my angel investing ‘anti-portfolio’, the deals I turned down that went on to make it very big.

Fortunately I did invest in two startups that were acquired by publicly-traded companies (and quickly), which likely put me in top 10% VC performance returns for that time period.

PayPal, then known as Confinity, had a business model that didn’t make sense to me at all. It was all about money transfers via PalmPilots! They were even talking about installing PalmPilots at supermarket checkout counters so you could pay with your PalmPilot and PayPal when you bought groceries.

Fortunately, the team was able to pivot and discover product-market fit with payments over email (and web and Ebay) and execute amazingly well!

I knew Luke Nosek from the team from before PayPal and met the other founders and founding team members like Peter, Max and Ken early on. I served on their PayPal Developer Network Advisory Board when they set that up, as we used PayPal for subscriptions with Ryze.

I would pass on it again today due to the clearly unworkable business plan at that time, and my lack of knowledge of the leadership team’s excellence.

The other is an unforced error as I was planning to invest in Salesforce.com but did not reply in time for the offering I was planning to invest in. But the worst part is that I probably could have bought some stock later since I know and socialized with founder Marc Benioff. So this one was probably the biggest mistake and lesson.

The lesson: Be willing to hustle to get an allocation, especially if you have contacts at the firm you’d like to invest in. And also don’t be embarrassed about investing a small amount.

Follow me on Twitter and Instagram as @AdrianScottcom and say hi